Skip to main content

What to grow in February

Unsure what to grow in February?

Summer is in full swing and you might be noticing that your summer crop is having its last hoorah.
You might notice the tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum still going strong.
This month is time to start thinking about getting the garden ready for autumn planting ready for a winter harvest.  Here’s what to plant this month to keep your patch going strong..

What to plant

But, you find yourself asking “Will this grow where I live?”
“What to plant in February” is split by the different Australian climate zones

What Seeds to Plant Now?

Check out our regional zone planting guide. Find which zone you are in on the map.  Then browse our organic seeds collection

Grow in February. Australia heatmap

Tropical (North Qld, NT & WA)

HERBS: Basil

FRUIT & VEGETABLES: capsicum, chilli, cucumber, eggplant, sweet potato, sweetcorn and tomato.

FLOWERS: ageratum, celosia, cineria, coleus, globe amaranth, impatiens, marigold, salvia, sunflower

This is traditionally the wettest month of the year for those of you up in the tropics.  Wait until the soil dries before planting any new seeds to prevent them from being waterlogged.

Subtropical (South-east Qld & Northern NSW)

HERBS: basil & chives

FRUIT & VEGETABLES: avocado, beans (french and climbing), beetroot, broccoli, cabbage, capsicum, cauliflower, chilli, citrus trees, cucumber, eggplant, guava, kale, leek, lettuce, lychee, mango, pumpkin, radish, silverbeet, spring onion, squash, swede, sweetcorn, tomato, turnip and zucchini.

FLOWERS: ageratum, amaranthus, alyssum, bellis perennis, carnation, celosia, cineraria, globe amaranth, impatiens, livingstone daisy, lobelia, marigold, nigella, pansy, poppy, primula, salvia, stock, sunflower, viola, virginian stock and wallflower

If your soil is still water logged, wait until the end of summer / early Autumn to start planting fruit trees.

Arid / Semi-Arid (Outback & dry inland areas)

HERBS: basil & chives

FRUIT & VEGETABLES: beans (french and climbing), beetroot, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, cucumber, eggplant, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, pumpkin, radish, silverbeet, spring onion, squash, swede, sweetcorn, tomato, turnip and zucchini.

FLOWERS: alyssum, bellis perennis, calendula, carnation, cineraria, gypsophilia, hollyhock, linaria, livingstone daisy, lobelia, marigold, nigella, pansy, poppy, stock, sweet william, viola, virginian stock and wallflower

While it is still a little too warm in the arid zones, you can plant cucumber that will produce a lot of crops once the weather starts cooling off.  If you do plant any other vegetables, cover the seedlings with a shade cloth and keep them well watered.

Warm Temperate (Sydney, coastal NSW & Victoria, Adelaide and Perth)

HERBS: basil & chives

FRUIT & VEGETABLES: Asian greens, basil, beans (french and climbing), beetroot, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celery, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, parsnip, radish, silverbeet, spring onion, swede, turnip and zucchini.

FLOWERS: ageratum, amaranthus, alyssum, bellis perennis, calendula, carnation, cineria, forget-me-not, foxglove, gypsophilia, hollyhock, impatiens, linaria, livingstone daisy, lobelia, marigold, nigella, pansy, poppy, primula, stock, sweet william, viola, virginian stock, wallflower

Cold Temperate (Melbourne & cool highlands)

HERBS: Chives

FRUIT & VEGETABLES: Asian greens, beetroot, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celery, chives, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, parsnip, radish, silver beet, spring onion, swede and turnip.

FLOWERS: ageratum, bellis perennis, calendula, carnation, cineria, forget-me-not, foxglove, gypsophilia, hollyhock, impatiens, linaria, livingstone daisy, lobelia, nigella, pansy, poppy, primula, stock, sweet william, viola, virginian stock, wallflower

Late February is the best time to start planting those winter vegetables in both warm and cool temperate regions.

A few points to remember:

Alyssum flower is listed as invasive in parts of the United States.  In California it has taken over coastal dunes, prairies and it can choke out native plants.  To avoid alyssum taking over your garden, plant in pots to keep it contained.

Weeding is a great job to do at this time of year as they will be growing gangbusters!. Regularly check your garden for weeds, remove and bin flower or seed heads from the established weeds, put the remaining material into the compost. Check out Top 5 Weeding Tips For Your Garden to tidy up your patch.

Add a good layer of mulch on your vegetable patches, herb gardens and ornamental beds. A hot summer tip is to mulch after watering the patch, to a depth of about 7cm. Keep mulch clear of plant stems, especially young seedlings.

Water the garden first thing in the morning. This allows your patch to hydrate before the heat sets in. A nice, deep drink a couple of times a week is far more beneficial than frequent, short watering.

Consider planting a green manure crop to rejuvenate an overworked patch. This will improve your soil incredibly, and, for a bit of forward planning, you’ll find it well worth the effort! You can read our blog Your Ultimate Guide to Green Manure to find out more about green manure.