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What to grow in September

September is a great month for gardeners!  There is so much to plant in every region of the country. Here’s some ideas on what to plant now in the garden this month

What to plant

Out of the cold and into glorious Spring, September is a fantastic time for gardeners to get into the garden. The afternoons are getting longer, and the chill is mostly gone from the mornings and evenings. So, need some inspiration for what plants to get in the garden in your area?

Check out our regional zone planting guide. Find which zone you are in on the map.

Image source: Gardening Australia magazine

Tropical (North Qld, NT & WA)

HERBS, FRUIT & VEGETABLES: Asian greens, basil, capsicum, carrot, chilli, choko, eggplant, ginger, okra, pumpkin, rosella, spring onion, sweetcorn, sweet potato and tomato.

FLOWERS: Ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, bedding begonia, californian poppy, carnation, cosmos, dahlia, dianthus, gerbera, impatiens, marigold, nasturtium, petunia, phlox, portulaca, salvia, snapdragon, sunflower and zinnia.

Subtropical (South-east Qld & Northern NSW)

HERBS, FRUIT & VEGETABLES: Artichoke, asian greens, asparagus crowns, basil, beans (french and climbing), beetroot, cabbage, capsicum, carrot, celery, chilli, chives,  choko, coriander, eggplant, ginger, jerusalem artichoke, lettuce, melon, okra, potato, pumpkin, radish, rocket, rosella, silverbeet, spring onion, sweetcorn, sweet potato, tomato, turnip and zucchini/squash.

FLOWERS: Ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, bedding begonia, californian poppy, carnation, cineraria, cosmos, dahlia, dianthus, everlasting daisy, gerbera, gypsophylia, impatiens, marigold, nasturtium, petunia, phlox, portulaca, salvia, snapdragon, sunflower, verbana and zinnia.

Arid / Semi-Arid (Outback & dry inland areas)

HERBS, FRUIT & VEGETABLES: Artichokes, asian greens, asparagus crowns, basil, beans (french and climbing) beetroot, cabbage, capsicum, carrot, celery, chilli, chives, coriander, eggplant, ginger, jerusalem artichoke, kale, lettuce, melon, okra, onion, peas, potato, pumpkin, radish, rocket, rosella, silverbeet, spring onion, sweetcorn, sweet potato, tomato, turnip and zucchini/squash.

FLOWERS: Alyssum, bedding begonia, californian poppy, carnation, delphinium, dianthus, everlasting daisy, gerbera, gypsophylia, marigold, nasturtium, petunia, phlox, portulaca, salvia, snapdragon and verbana.

Warm Temperate (Sydney, coastal NSW & Victoria, Adelaide and Perth)

HERBS, FRUIT & VEGETABLES: Artichokes, asian greens, asparagus crowns, basil, beans (french and climbing), beetroot, broccoli, cabbage, capsicum, carrot, celery, chilli, chives, coriander, eggplant, endive, jerusalem artichoke, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, melon, onion, peas, potato, pumpkin, radish, rocket, silverbeet, snow peas, spring onion, sweetcorn, tomato, turnip and zucchini/squash.

FLOWERS: Ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, bedding begonia, californian poppy, carnation, cosmos, dahlia, delphinium, dianthus, everlasting daisy, gerbera, gypsophilia, impatiens, marigold, nasturtium, petunia, phlox, portulaca, salvia, snapdragon, verbena and zinnia.

Cold Temperate (Melbourne & cool highlands)

VEGGIES, FRUITS, HERBS: Artichokes, asian greens, asparagus crowns, beetroot, broccoli, cabbage, capsicum, carrot, celery, chilli, coriander, eggplant, endive, jerusalem artichoke, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, melon, onion, peas, potato, pumpkin, radish, rocket, silverbeet, snow peas, spring onion, tomato, turnip and zucchini/squash.

FLOWERS: Alyssum, carnation, delphinium, dianthus, everlasting daisy, gypsophilia, marigold, snapdragon, sweet pea and verbena.

A few points to remember:

When planting herbs, ensure the frosts have cleared beforehand, so your plants have the best opportunity to grow. September is a fantastic time to top up mulch on your veggie patches, herb gardens and ornamental plants. 

For all your plants in containers, now is the time to increase  the amount and frequency of watering.

Give your indoor plants some loving and a fresh new pot and mulch, and treat them to a seaweed tonic afterwards to make them extra happy. 

Consider a green manure crop to add some life and love to an overworked patch.

With growing blooming flowers also comes aphids!  The sap in the new plants attracts aphids and they breed at an extraordinary rate.  Sap sucking weakens the new growth, causing distortion as plant tissue develops, sooty mould and transmit viruses among your plants.  Aphids come in difference colours, like green, orange, black and grey and are mostly 2-3mm long.  Apply a good coverage OCP eco-oil over the affected plants.  This will also attract beneficial insects that feed in aphids.

Information source: Gardening Australia Magazine – September 2022 & Sustainable Gardening Australia